Dear Snow–You are Welcome in the South

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I used to think I had a love/hate relationship with snow. I am from the Midwest, which means I have experienced more than my fair share of below zero windchill, slippery ice, 6 + inches of snow on ground for months, scraping my car off, and warming my car for 30 minutes before I even get in it to go anywhere.

Now last year was our first winter in South Carolina. It was warm, very mild and definitely no snowfall. This year my children were desperately praying for a snowfall, especially when we missed a heavy snowfall on our trip back from Illinois after Christmas. Our hometown got hit with snow the day after we left—I was thrilled but the kids were not. But I must admit I was wishing we would see a minor snowfall here in South Carolina for verification that we did not leave snow forever. I realize it is not the beautiful pristine white flakes that fall from the sky and leave a satin white blanket on the ground that I do not like. It is the litany of complaints in the previous paragraph that used to make me grumpy from November to March in the Midwest.

So needless to say we were ELATED late Saturday afternoon when the conditions were finally perfect for a 1-2 inch snowfall here in South Carolina. The temperature was about 30 degrees and the beautiful flakes fell and created a thin blanket of snow on the grass. It was just enough for the kids to have a brief winter wonderland.

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Made a snow angel

The kids ran outside–no snow pants or long underwear required—just hats, gloves and a coat. The best part- the snow melted the next day. It did not melt halfway leaving a slushy muddy mess. It completely melted in the warm 45 degree sunshine. Sorry snow–it was not you I disliked–it was the Midwest winter. So I hope to see you again here in the South, as long as you leave as quickly as you come. 🙂

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About Jennifer Walker, MS

I currently blog about mindfulness, meaningful life-learning, Montessori and Childhood Apraxia of Speech.
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